Wild yeast on tangerine skin., still on the tree
Wild yeast on tangerine skin., still on the tree

So I'm double checking the recipe, putting together the hop additions, and generally preparing for a brew day. I see I have twice as much West Coast Ale yeast as I need, so the logical thing to do is...
...not use it?!?!  o_O

I have a full pitch of a wild yeast I cultivated from a bruised tangerine skin on a tree in the pilot brewery yard. I'm going to use it for this beer. This time Foundational IPA will use the baseline grain bill and bittering hop we will use for all batches. It will have a feature hop for flavor and aroma - Sorachi Ace - as will all Foundational IPAs. But it will also feature a true house yeast from wild sourcing in Southern California.

Working with wild sourced yeast is a little tricky, so keep your fingers crossed. If I get the activity I anticipate from this yeast, this should be on draft on the weekend of November 14th.

Cheers!
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=BCT=

Cultivating wild yeast.
Cultivating wild yeast.

A wee keg of The Dub, by BCT Brewing Project.
A wee keg of The Dub, by BCT Brewing Project.

Did I say I'm not a big fan of most pumpkin Holiday beer? I mean, it's Ok if you like them - everyone has their thing. But I've only found a few that I like. But then what do you do if you're not a fan of pumpkin beer, but you want a good holiday beverage?

Well, there's a few holiday seasonals that I do like, and there's a few all year beers that fit the theme as well. The Dub for example is not brewed as a holiday beer, but it fits the need. It's a rich, American tilted version of the Belgian Dubbel style with aromas and flavors like brown bread, caramel, a bit of cocoa, molasses, dried dark fruit, and subtle spiciness. It's a comfortable quaff any time, and it'll do for damn sure during the holidays.

I kegged a batch up last night. It will be on draft on Friday to kick off the Halloween weekend. And I couldn't resist packaging up a 2.5 gallon keg to take home. I like it. You're going to like it. Come on down on Friday and for the next several weeks to get you some.

Cheers and Happy Holidays!
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=BCT=

I Dub Thee, "The Dub".
I Dub Thee, "The Dub".

I decided that 13.13.13 - the name for this beer in the previous non-commercial batches - crowds the name space of Stone Brewing Company's vertical epic series to a degree that I wouldn't like if done to the name of one of my beers. Sure, the concept for the beer is rooted in my review of every recipe from 2.2.2 through 12.12.12, but it decidedly expresses the Beancurdturtle Brewing influence more than the Stone backbone.

A very Belgian grain bill, plus Belgian Candi Syrup, plus the Westvleteren yeast strain, plus American hops, and a touch of dried Black Mission Figs and Candied Ginger. It's richer than a typical old world Belgian Dubbel, and is deeply complex. If you like the Belgian Dubbel style, it should suit your tastes very well. If you want a Holiday Beer - but like me are not a fan of pumpkin beer - then The Dub will do for damn sure.

Oh, and yes I know the modern slang for "dub". But let's just say you can instead use the term in the olde-worlde way. Get a pour, raise your chalice, turn to the closest random stranger, pretend you are a King or Queen and speak in a bad imitation of an old English accent, and proclaim with solemn gravitas, "I Dub thee, Sir Peeshispantsalot!".

Time to go update some web pages with the new name...

à Votre Santé!
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=BCT=

Andreas of Pirate Brew GmbH working out.
Andreas of Pirate Brew GmbH working out.

BCT Brewing Project is looking forward to brewing a collaboration crafted by Beancurdturtle Brewing LLC and Pirate Brew GmbH. A Russian Imperial Stout with Cacao nibs, Vanilla Beans, and a little spice. Pirate Brew GmbH will brew it in Europe, and we'll brew it in the USA.

It will take a little time to get it into rotation, but when we're ready...
Damn the Reinheitsgebot - and full speed ahead! Maybe we'll call it "Captain Jack Turtle".

Cheers!
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=BCT=

Hot weather, good for vacation, bad for fermentation.
Hot weather, good for vacation, bad for fermentation.

An apology for lack of BCT Brewing Project beers follows, but first a question about Mother Nature. Why must she be such a hot momma?

The recent high temps in Riverside would have been OK for Belgian styles and especially Saison (high fermentation temps favor this style). Lucky for the rest of the team at Brew Crew, except for a couple Belgian styles, the fermenters other than ours were empty. But we had an IPA and a Red Ale in the fermenters. These styles are best fermented at under 70°F, and that's not what they got.

I must apologize and say, we won't have Foundational IPA and Robin's Red to serve to you. Due to a combination of high temperature weather and challenges with refrigeration technology, these last two batches reached temperatures during fermentation that were unkind (understatement) to beers of their styles. Unfortunately they are undrinkable by my standards. Some people would say, "That's not bad. I could drink that and catch a buzz." But that's not what BCT Brewing project beers are about. If I can't honestly say I would taste it, say "That'll do indeed!" and be tempted to have a second pour, then I'm not going to serve it. So I dumped gallons upon gallons of beer, literally down the drain. *sigh*

Ok, let's put on a happy face and look forward...
This Saturday I brew Bon Souvenir, a wonderful Wallonian styled Saison tipped a bit hop forward to please the US West Coast palate. The next Saturday I brew 13.13.13, a gorgeous Belgian Styled Dubbel with a touch of candied ginger and dried black fig. Each should be ready to start pouring on the Saturday two weeks after the brew day (even if the fermentation temps rise a little).

So, sorry for the limited tap handles, but the beers coming to fill them will be terrific.

Cheers!

=BCT=